Archive for the ‘Course 2013’ Category

Richard Gordon, DickGordonCan@gmail.com Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory http://www.facebook.com/GulfSpecimenMarineLab Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, February 13, 2013 Abstract Presentation /files/presentations/Gordon2013b.pdf Biography see http://embryogenesisexplained.com/2012/03/cause-and-effect.html Links Richard Gordon, A Tale of Two Papers Richard Gordon, University of Manitoba & Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory, Walking the tightrope: The dilemmas of hierarchical instabilities in Turing’s morphogenesis Dick Gordon, Cause […]

Melinda Bonnie Fagan Assistant Professor of Philosophy Rice University mbf2@rice.edu (713) 348-2298 Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, February 6, 2013 Abstract The epigenetic landscape is a model of development, originally proposed by C. H. Waddington to visually explicate an integrated theory of genetics, development and evolution.  This simple, evocative model represents development as an […]

Ille C. Gebeshuber Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Austria Aramis Technologies Sdn. Bhd., Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia gebeshuber@iap.tuwien.ac.at Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, January 30, 2013 Abstract One of the fascinating aspects of nanotechnology is that on the nanometer scale all the natural […]

Albert K Harris Professor of Biology UNC-Chapel Hill Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, January 23, 2013 Abstract Malcolm Steinberg invented the “Differential Adhesion Hypothesis” (Steinberg 1963, 1970).  His key idea was that aggregations of cells are thermodynamically equivalent to drops of liquids, and that maximization of adhesions between cells acts like maximization of molecule-to-molecule […]

Albert K Harris Professor of Biology UNC-Chapel Hill Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, January 16, 2013 Abstract Sponge cells constantly rearrange, just as much from one day to the next as when their cells are mechanically separated from each other. H. V. Wilson discovered the ability of sponge and coral cells to rearrange into normal […]

Richard Gordon, DickGordonCan@gmail.com Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory http://www.facebook.com/GulfSpecimenMarineLab Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, January 9, 2013 Abstract A cytoskeletal structure (the cell state splitter) at the apical end of epithelial cells, that we predicted [1] and observed [2], may be set up in a metastable state and explain the binary nature of cell differentiations due to […]