Archive for the ‘Course 2012’ Category

Timothy Newman Professor of Biophysics SULSA Research Chair of Systems Biology College of Life Sciences Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, May 9, 2012 Abstract I will discuss nine ways in which physical and biological systems differ, and how this should affect the way physical scientists approach biology. The talk will follow the mnemonic: L-ength […]

Alexei A. Sharov Laboratory of Genetics National Institute on Aging (NIA/NIH) Baltimore, USA Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, May 2, 2012 Abstract According to physics, time and space are universal categories, and change is a trajectory in time and space. However, in biology there is an alternative concept of time that goes back to […]

Alexei A. Sharov Laboratory of Genetics National Institute on Aging (NIA/NIH) Baltimore, USA Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, April 25, 2012 Abstract In contrast to the human standard for mind established by Turing, I search for a minimal mind, which is present in animals and even lower-level organisms. Mind is a tool for classification […]

Alexei A. Sharov Laboratory of Genetics National Institute on Aging (NIA/NIH) Baltimore, USA Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, April 18, 2012 Abstract The “modern synthesis” in evolutionary theory is ideologically-biased and ignores many well-described patterns and mechanisms. Biosemiotics offers an alternative interpretation of evolution by assuming that living organisms are not passive tokens sorted […]

Evgenii Rudnyi Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, April 11, 2012 Abstract I will review a book of Jeffrey A. Gray, Consciousness: Creeping up on the Hard Problem In his book, the famous neuroscientist discusses experimental results on consciousness. By consciousness he understands conscious experience only. Intelligence, self, language is outside of the considerations. The […]

Bradly Alicea Cellular Reprogramming Laboratory Michigan State University Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, April 4, 2012 Abstract As complex, dynamic, and often labyrinthine entities, the modeling of biological systems should not be treated using conventional computational structures and techniques. A recently developed parallel technique called GPU (graphical processing unit) computing offers a number of […]

Marta Linde-Medina New York Medical College Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, March 28, 2012 Abstract How a structure has evolved depends on how it develops. A present evo-devo model for the bird beak, a classical system in evolutionary biology, is based on the idea of a genetic program for development, i.e. that the beak […]

Richard Gordon Theoretical Biologist Embryogenesis Center Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, March 21, 2012 Abstract Presentation /files/presentations/Gordon2012.pdf Biography I’m Richard (Dick) Gordon, an itinerant theoretical biologist, retired in 2011 as a Professor/Adjunct Professor of Pathology, Radiology, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Botany, Physics, Biosystems Engineering, Zoology, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Medical Physics […]

Alexei A. Sharov Laboratory of Genetics National Institute on Aging (NIA/NIH) Baltimore, USA Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, March 14, 2012 Abstract Biosemiotics is a new discipline that integrates biology with semiotics, which is a theory on signs, meaning, and knowledge. The main idea of biosemiotics is that life has informational nature and it […]

M. Lisa Manning Assistant Professor Department of Physics Syracuse University Presented in the Embryo Physics Course, March 7, 2012 Abstract Biological tissues often behave like elastic solids on short time scales and fluids on long time scales. Different tissue types exhibit different characteristic macroscopic mechanical properties such as surface tension and viscosity, and cell rearrangements […]